Tradition of Excellence
Colorado Surgical Service
Home About Services Locations Articles Forms employment Contact
Spacer
Docs 1 Docs 2 Sky Mountains
Spacer
Spacer
  Lung Cancer
Dotted Line
  Thyroid Cancer
Dotted Line
  Melanoma
Dotted Line
  Open Inguinal Hernia Repair
Dotted Line
  Ventral Hernia Repair
Dotted Line
  Gastroesophageal
Reflux Disease
Dotted Line
  Laparoscopic Inguinal & Ventral Hernia Repair
Dotted Line
  Parathyroid Disease
Dotted Line
  Thyroid Nodules
Dotted Line
  Gall Bladder Disease
Dotted Line
  Diverticular Disease
Dotted Line
  Colorectal Cancer
Dotted Line
  Hemorrhoids
Dotted Line
  Breast Cancer
Dotted Line
  Benign Breast Disease
Dotted Line
articles
     
  Open Ventral & Umbilical Hernia Repair

Incisional, Ventral, Epigastric, or Umbilical hernias are defects of the anterior abdominal wall. They may be congenital (umbilical hernia) or acquired (incisional). Incisional hernias form after surgery through the incision site or previous drain sites, or laparoscopic trocar insertion sites. Incisional hernias are reported to occur in approximately 4-10% of patients after open surgical procedures. Certain risk factors predispose patients to develop incisional hernias, such as obesity, diabetes, respiratory insufficiency ( lung disease), steroids, wound contamination, postoperative wound infection, smoking, inherited disorders such as Marfan's syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, as well as poor surgical technique. Approximately 90,000-100,000 incisional hernia repairs are performed annually in the United States .

These hernias present much the same way inguinal hernias do. That is, they present with a bulge near or at a previous incision. Some patients may experience discomfort, abdominal cramping or complete intestinal obstruction, or incarceration as a result of these hernias.

The principle of surgical repair often entails the use of prosthetic mesh to repair large defects in order to minimize tension on the repair.  A tension free repair has a lesser chance of hernia recurrence. Smaller defects such as umbilical hernias can often be closed without tension by simple suture repair without mesh. Traditionally, the old scar is incised and removed, and the entire length of the incision inspected. Generally, there are multiple hernia defects other than the one(s) discovered by physical examination. The area requiring coverage is usually large and requires much surgical dissection. A prosthetic mesh is used to cover the defect(s), and the wound closed. This is a major surgical procedure and often complicated. Infection rates following repair may be as high a 7.0%. Recurrence can be up to 5%, or higher, depending on the patient's preoperative risk factors. While the use of prosthetic mesh has decreased the number of recurrences, it has also been implicated in increased infection rates, adhesion or scar formation of the abdominal contents to the anterior abdominal wall leading to intestinal obstruction and fistula formation. However, overall, recovery is usually excellent and patients return to normal activity within a matter of weeks.

Patients may be admitted the same day of their surgery. Following the procedure and recovery from anesthesia, they are taken to a hospital room where they spend the night. Small ventral hernias and umbilical hernias can be discharged the same day as surgery. We encourage our patients to move as quickly as possible. It is extremely important to be active early in order to stave off some of the complication seen postoperatively, such as pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (clots in the legs that break off and go the lungs). Postoperative pain is variable, and can be considerable during the first 24 hours. Patients that need to stay in the hospital are given I.V. narcotics as needed, and are changed to oral analgesics the next day. Generally, most patients with incisional hernias stay in the hospital 1 or 3 days following surgery. Patients are then seen, by the surgeon, one to two weeks after discharge. There is no dietary restriction. Activity level is restricted by the patient's comfort level. However, it is generally not advisable to engage in any strenuous exercise or heavy lifting for six weeks, to allow the hernia repair to heal

 

 

 

 

 

 
     

 

 
 
Spacer


About | Services | Locations | Articles | Forms | Employment | Contact | Home
©2007 Colorado Surgical Service